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Hailey Idaho Makes TOP 10 Small Towns

Congratulations! Hailey, Idaho, has been named a Top 10 Small Town, 2014 by Livability.com, a national website that ranks quality of life and travel amenities of America’s small to mid-sized cities.

For this list of cities, editors analyzed more data on micropolitan areas than ever before. Using metrics from Esri, they started by looking at cities with populations under 20,000, then dug into statistics like cost of living, health-care spending, racial and socioeconomic diversity, adult obesity, crime, civic engagement, air quality and natural amenities, just to name a few of the 41 data points. After narrowing down the list, editors conducted a visual assessment of the cities and found out what visitors had to say about them and what residents liked about living there.

“Throughout the U.S., we’re seeing a resurgence of emphasis on downtowns in cities of all sizes,” says Livability.com Editor Matt Carmichael. “It’s nice to see in the big cities, certainly, but it’s especially great to see these smaller towns not just holding their own, but also thriving.”

Hailey offers residents a laid-back atmosphere with an astonishing amount of outdoor recreational options. In addition to good schools, low crime, low pollution and high community involvement, Hailey has the highest level of employment and the greatest income distribution of any city on our list. Tourism plays a large role in Hailey’s business scene today. Residents can also enjoy outdoor excursions to nearby ski resorts, hiking trails and fishing holes.

Again, congratulations on making the Livability.com list of Top 10 Small Towns, 2014!

For More information on Hailey Idaho please contact the Hailey Chamber of Commerce info@haileyidaho.com .

Top 10 Small Towns, 2014

  1. Los Alamos, NM
  2. Northfield, MN
  3. Lebanon, NH
  4. Hood River, OR
  5. Port Angeles, WA
  6. Glenwood Springs, CO
  7. Spearfish, SD
  8. Heber City, UT
  9. Traverse City, MI
  10. Hailey, ID

 

About Livability.com: Livability.com explores what makes small to mid-sized cities great places to live, work and visit. We examine issues related to livability such as walkability, cultural amenities, transportation, urban planning and sustainability through exclusive research and discussions on our blog. We celebrate the accomplishments of these cities through our monthly top 10 lists, our annual ranking of livable cities and our interactions on social media. Livability.com is a product of Journal Communications Inc.

 

What’s My Home Worth? Free Market Analysis

NEW DIRECT FLIGHTS – Denver to Sun Valley

United Airlines will offer nonstop service between Denver and Sun Valley this summer, and those involved in securing the service say they hope it will continue next winter.

The new route, which will add 5,500 additional seats into Sun Valley for the summer, was announced Monday by Fly Sun Valley Alliance, the Friedman Memorial Airport Authority and Sun Valley Resort, which worked in partnership to secure the new flights. The route will be supported by a U.S. Department of Transportation Small Communities Air Service Development Program Grant for $500,000, awarded to the airport last fall.

CRJ 700 cockpit - New direct flights from Denver to Sun Valley

The United Express flights will run from July 2 through Sept. 23, 2014, and be operated by SkyWest Airlines using CRJ 700 regional jet aircraft with 70 seats—six in first class and 64 in economy, including 16 extra-legroom seats. The flight will run daily from July 2 to Aug. 25 and five times per week from Aug. 26 to Sept. 23.

The three local partners stated that they are working with United to add winter service for the Denver-Sun Valley route, and hope to confirm a contract by late spring for next winter.

A press release states that the flight schedule has been structured to take full advantage of connections from all major eastern markets:

  • Departs DEN at 7:15 p.m., arrives SUN at 9:03 p.m.
  • Departs SUN at 7:30 a.m., arrives DEN at 9:11 a.m.

This new nonstop route to Sun Valley will allow additional connectivity to eastern U.S. cities and other destinations in United’s global route network

Vic Kerckhoff, United’s director of leisure sales

“We are pleased to be expanding our service to the Sun Valley market and look forward to a long-term successful partnership.”

The new flights can be booked on www.united.com.

Bargin Airfares to Sun Valley!

Take advantage of a great fare on one of Alaska Airlines newest routes, or other destinations.

Explore More. Spend Less.

Purchase by January 13, 2014.
Special Air Fares to Sun Valley Idaho

MAGAZINE: Sun Valley Guide 2013/2014 Edition

VIDEO: The Marketing Alliance Activities and Status Report


For “Visit Sun Valley” executive director Arlene Schieven, there were the typical surprises that came with a new job when she moved to the Valley two years ago to lead the promotion initiative, but none greater than having to adjust to a relatively small million dollar budget. The native Canadian, having spent more than a decade working for Whistler with marketing budgets well into the tens of millions, Schieven has remained constantly challenged on how to spend such limited resources to have the most marketing impact.

In her interview with the Keystone early last August, Arlene shares her thoughts on where . . . Read More

SOURCE: Ketchum Keystone

5 Ridiculous Seller Sayings That Kill Deals!

When I need a good laugh, I like to read Vanity Fair magazine’s ‘Actual Complaints from Actual Rich People’ column. The monthly column is a super-short, super-funny compilation of woes of the very rich, as overheard by the author.  My guess is that most of these sayings seemed totally sensible to the person who said them in the course of the conversation. In retrospect and out of context, though, they seem crazy and out-of-touch, even ridiculous.

Here’s a recent example: “I don’t ask my wife how many horses she has, she doesn’t ask me how many cars I have.”

Ridiculous, right?  Well, while these folks are easy to poke fun at, many of us say things during a heated moment or emotional experience that we have a hard time standing behind later. Selling your home is one of those experiences that causes even the most stable, calm human being to feel panic, outrage, anxiety, and sometimes all of the above, all at the same time.

These volatile emotions give rise to a handful of seller sayings that seem silly when seen in a sober light.  Here they are, along with some insights to help you ensure you don’t let them foul up your home selling decisions.


 

Don’t Let Emotions Sabotage Your Sale!

1.  But I spent X years or $X on that!  The ability to customize your home to your personal tastes and your family’s wants and needs is one of the biggest non-financial perks of home ownership.  Creating a soundproof meditation room or a floating pool theater is your right as a home owner.

MOO-15750039I encourage owners to make changes to their homes that will improve their quality of life while they live there, rather than fixating on whether they’ll be able to recoup their investment when they sell it 20 years down the line. (Of course, if you’re planning to sell in the near future, it might not make sense to invest in super-personalized home improvement projects.)

That said, the fact that YOU loved the idea of having a sports court, billiards room or Japanese garden enough to spend tens of thousands of dollars on it does not necessarily mean that your home’s buyer will place the same value on it – or any value, for that matter. I was once involved in a sale where the sellers had spent decades cultivating a beautifully complex Japanese garden which the buyers, busy professionals, had no time or interest in maintaining.

Not only were they not willing to pay a premium for it, they planned to rip it out and replace it with low-maintenance, low-water landscaping.

Let it go. Understand that other than the kitchen, bathroom, amenity and decor upgrades that appeal to many home buyers, if you’ve invested your time or money in customizations for your own personal enjoyment, then your enjoyment is your return on that investment.  If your home’s eventual buyer also happens to love them, fantastic!  But don’t approach the home selling process expecting every buyer to share your value system and pay through the nose for them.

 

2.  We just need to find a buyer who understands my tastes.  There are certainly occasions, with rare properties, where there is truly a narrow niche of buyers that will have to find, understand and appreciate a property. In cases like that, with acreage, converted warehouses, horse properties, and the like, this saying is not ridiculous at all.

But this saying is ridiculous when it is uttered by the owner of a home with potentially wide appeal as a reason for not staging or preparing their home for sale, or in the effort to avoid neutralizing highly, uh, personal design and decor choices.

If your home is lagging on the market while others sell, and your agent has suggested that you tone down the polka dot paint job or delete the Al Pacino mural on your dining room walls, think about how much time and money your decision to wait for the buyer who understands these design choices is costing you.

Rethink your position: as the ultimate marketing decision-maker in your home’s sale, your job is to maximize your home’s appeal to a broad segment of ready, willing and able buyers (not to find the one needle in a haystack who likes the Godfather as much as you). You’re moving on from the property, so move on emotionally, too. Don’t let your emotional attachment to your decor decisions or stubborn refusal to spend on staging keep your life or your finances stuck.

3.  I want to price it high, so I have room to come down.  Now, in all fairness – there’s a time and a place for this.  By that I mean that there are certainly local markets where it’s very much standard practice for buyers to expect to come in below asking, and sellers can price their properties a few thousand dollars higher than the target price point without killing their deals.  If you live in a place like this, your agent will surely work with you to price accordingly.

That said, when the market is slow enough that buyers are routinely paying below asking for homes, pricing your home above-market is actually dangerous. It runs the risk of causing no one to view your home as a good enough value to see it in the first place.

If other sellers are pricing appropriately and yours is priced too high over what the market will bear, many buyers won’t even bother trying to negotiate you down.  Rather, they’ll go find one of the homes on the market with a more realistic price, they’ll wait until you lower the price or they’ll wait until your home has been lagging so long they sense you might be desperate, and will swoop in with a lowball offer of their own.

Even in a relatively hot market climate like today’s, the aggressively priced homes get the most buyer traffic and, accordingly, get the most offers. In turn, these bidding wars drive the eventual sales price up. If you want to sell your home in a buyer’s market, or sell it at top dollar in a seller’s market, overpricing it might actually sabotage your success.

4.  That offer is an insult – I won’t even dignify it with a response. Your home might be very personal to you. It represents a massive investment of your money, time, hopes and dreams. It probably also represents your personal tastes, style and some precious memories of your family’s life.

But once it’s on the market, get a thick skin and decide not to take anything – anything – personally. If someone offers to pay many thousands of dollars for your home, it’s not an insult, even if the offer is far afield from what you are willing to sell the home for, or from what you believe it is worth. They might be deeply misguided, and not yet experienced enough in the market to know that the offer was unreasonable. Or they might just love your home and be going for it, even though it’s really outside of their personal resources.

Finally, they might actually just be trying to get you to come down a bit on the asking price. Some buyers see making a very low offer as part and parcel of negotiations.

In any event, you should always respond to an offer made by a qualified buyer. If you have another offer or offer(s) that are more realistic, just respond with a pleasant decline.  If you have no other offers, respond with what you and your agent formulate as an appropriate counter.  You might be surprised at how even a very low offer can come together with a respectful, reality-based counteroffer and a little negotiating.

5.  I need $X to get the home I want and take my Australia trip – let’s list the place for that.There are lots of respectable strategies for setting a list price, but all of them have their basis in one thing: data. They all start with a look at the nearby, similar homes that have recently sold, and what they sold for; this is what agents call “comparable sales data.”

Depending on market dynamics, trends in inventory and home values, how similar/dissimilar your home is to the recently sold properties and what your own priorities are (e.g., sell fast, sell for top dollar, etc.), an experienced local agent might advise you to start with “the comps” and adjust your home’s list price down a bit, or to start with “the comps” and adjust upwards to get to your home’s list price.

But never will a savvy, experienced agent tell you that the proper way to price your home or understand its value is to do the math on how much cash you want and need, and set your list price by that.

Of course – you need to do your “move up math” in the process of listing your home in order to know whether your home sale is feasible or not. And you might actually have to factor in what you need to pay off your mortgage and move into your pricing decisions – that’s not bizarre.

But you should do so only with the awareness that your home’s ultimate value is based on what a qualified buyer is willing to pay for it – not what you need to move.

SOURCE: Trulia

Short Sale Stigma Surfacing?

In markets with high foreclosure rates, a short sale stigma may exist, and short sales may not be as sought among home buyers. Brokers may be at an advantage if they state in the listing that the nondistressed home they’re selling is “not a short sale,” suggests a new study, which evaluated 5,000 home sales in Boca Raton, Fla.

Homes listed as “not short sales” sold for 2 to 5 percent more than nondistressed homes that did not state that. Homes listed as “not a short sale” also sold faster, selling about 10 to 15 percent faster than other similar properties, according to the study’s author Ken H. Johnson, an associate professor at the Tibor and Sheila Hollo School of Real Estate at Florida International University in Miami.

“In some areas, buyers are probably starting to believe that short sales mean a big hassle because they’ve heard horror stories about waiting months for one or more banks to sign off on the deal,” Johnson says.

Johnson notes that the study’s findings speak to that particular local market in Boca Raton, “but I think you can extrapolate to other areas where we’ve seen a lot of distressed properties and foreclosures in the last few years,” says Johnson. “What we found is that, in those affected areas, there is a short sale stigma.”

SOURCE: Realtor Magazine

33 Day Market Time All Hallmark Listings Sold

Hallmark Idaho Properties in alliance with Cablela’s Trophy Properties is proud to announce that YTD for 2013, all company listings sold and closed had a market time of just 33 days from date of listing to contract sale date.

Utilizing a series of marketing strategies and systems, plus working hard at working with servicing other real estate agents within the local community has been essential in achieving such positive sales results.

While complying in the information is was also noted the many of the listed properties had multiple offers for sellers to choose from with many sales prices above the asking price.

If your considering selling and want results, give Hallmark a call!

208-928-SOLD

CONSIDERING SELLING? Why Settle For 1989 Marketing & Technology

They say of picture is worth a thousand word. When it comes to real estate the saying should say

Professional photos can be worth Thousands of Dollars in your pocket!

Why settle for less?

Hallmark Idaho Properties is on the cutting edge when it comes to “Real Estate Marketing”.

Don’t just “List” your property when

     Hallmark Idaho Properties will “Market Your Property”!

Call today to see how we can help market your home for top dollar now matter what price range your home is in.

As always . . . we’re here to help.

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