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FHA Waives 3-year Foreclosure Waiting Period

Effective for FHA Case Numbers assigned on, or after, August 15, 2013, borrowers with a recent history of bankruptcy, foreclosure, judgment, short sale, loan modification or deed-in-lieu can apply — and get FHA-approved — for an FHA-insured mortgage.

The FHA has waived its 3-year foreclosure waiting period. If you’ve experienced any of the following financial difficulties, you may be program-eligible :

  • Pre-foreclosure sales
  • Short sales
  • Deed-in-lieu
  • Foreclosure
  • Chapter 7 bankruptcy
  • Chapter 13 bankruptcy
  • Loan modification
  • Forbearance agreements

The FHA realizes that, sometimes, credit events may be beyond your control, and that credit histories don’t always reflect a person’s true ability or willingness to pay on a mortgage.

FHA mortgage insurance is available for any loan which meets the following two conditions :

  • The loan must be made by an approved FHA lender
  • The loan must meet the minimum standards of the “FHA Mortgage Guidelines”.

The minimum standards of the FHA mortgage guidelines are straight-forward.

Some of the more well-known rules require mortgage applicants to show a minimum credit score of 500; to make a downpayment of at least 3.5% on a purchase; and, to verify income via W-2 or federal tax returns.

The guidelines also include such arcane topics as U.S. citizenship requirements for borrowers; relocation rules for trailing homes and income; and, minimum standards for condominiums and co-ops.

Loans failing to meet FHA mortgage guidelines do not get insured and the Federal Housing Administration has been steadily tightening its requirements since last decade’s housing downturn.

On August 15, 2013, though, the Federal Housing Administration moved to relax its guidelines for borrowers who “experienced periods of financial difficulty due to extenuating circumstances”.

Dubbed the “Back To Work – Extenuating Circumstances Program”, the FHA removed the familiar waiting periods that typically followed a derogatory credit event.

Use the Q&A below to learn more about the FHA’s Back to Work – Extenuating Circumstances program. 

What is the FHA Back To Work – Extenuating Circumstances program?

The FHA Back To Work – Extenuating Circumstances program is the FHA’s “second chance” for mortgage applicants who have experienced financial hardship as a result of unemployment or severe reduction in income.

Can I use the Back to Work as a first-time home buyer?

Yes, you can use the program as a first-time buyer.

Can I use the Back To Work program as a repeat home buyer?

Yes, you can use the program as a repeat home buyer.

Can I use the Back To Work program for an FHA 203k construction loan?

Yes, you can use the program for an FHA 203k construction loan.

Does the FHA Back To Work program waive the traditional 3-year waiting period after a foreclosure, short sale, or deed-in-lieu?

Yes, the program waives the agency’s three-year waiting period. You no longer need to wait three years to apply for an FHA loan after experiencing a foreclosure, short sale or deed-in-lieu.

Does the Back To Work program waive the traditional 2-year waiting period after bankruptcy?

Yes, the program waives the agency’s two-year waiting period. You no longer need to wait two years to apply for an FHA loan after experiencing a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

Which types of “events” are covered by the FHA Back To Work – Extenuating Circumstances program?

The program can be used by anyone who’s experienced a pre-foreclosure sale, short sale, deed-in-lieu, foreclosure, Chapter 7 bankruptcy, Chapter 13 bankruptcy, loan modification; or who has entered into a forbearance agreement.

How do I apply for the program?

You can apply for an FHA Back to Work – Extenuating Circumstances mortgage with any FHA-approved lender. The mortgage approval process is the same for any other FHA-insured mortgage.

What are mortgage rates for the FHA Back To Work program?

Mortgage rates are the same as mortgage rates for any other FHA loan. There is no premium on your interest rate, nor are there additional fees to pay at closing. Your mortgage rate will be unaffected by the FHA Back To Work program.

My current lender says that it’s not participating in the program? What do I do?

If your current lender is not participating in the FHA Back To Work program, you can find another lender that does.

What are the minimum eligibility requirements of the FHA Back To Work program?

In order to qualify, you must meet several minimum eligibility standards. The first is that you must have experienced an “economic event” (e.g.; pre-foreclosure sale, short sale, deed-in-lieu, foreclosure, Chapter 7 bankruptcy, Chapter 13 bankruptcy, loan modification, forbearance agreement). The second is that you must demonstrate a full recovery from the event. And, third, you must agree to complete housing counseling prior to closing. You must also show that your household income declined by 20% or more for a period of at least 6 months, which coincided with the above “economic event”.

How do I document a 20% loss of household income for the FHA?

In order to document a 20% loss of household income, you must present federal tax returns or W-2s, or a written Verification of Employment evidencing prior income. For loss of income based on seasonal or part-time employment, two years of seasonal or part-time employment in the same field must be verified and documented as well. Income after the onset of the economic event, which should represent a loss of at least 20% for at least six months, should be verified according to standard FHA guidelines. This may include W-2s, pay stubs, unemployment income receipts, or other. Your lender will help you determine the best method of verification.

How do I document a “satisfactory” credit history since my “economic event” for the FHA?

Your lender will review your credit report as part of the FHA Back To Work approval process. All accounts will be reviewed — ones which went delinquent and ones which remained current. Your lender will attempt to determine three things — that you showed good credit history prior to the economic event; that your derogatory credit occurred after the onset of the economic event; and, that you have re-established a 12-month history of perfect payment history on major accounts. Minor delinquencies are allowed on revolving accounts.

Does the “20 percent loss of income” eligibility condition apply to me only, or to everyone in the household?

The “20 percent loss of income” eligibility condition applies to everyone in the household. If one member of the household lost income as the result of a job less but the household income did not fall by 20 percent or more for a period of at least months, the borrower will not be FHA Ba Extenuating Circumstances-eligible.

Is the FHA Back To Work Program limited by loan size?

No, the program is not limited by loan size. The FHA will always insure up to your area’s local FHA loan limit. Your lender, however, may not. If your lender will not make a loan big enough for your needs, find another FHA-approved lender. There are many of them.

With the FHA Back To Work Program, how soon until I can buy a home after foreclosure?

Via the program, you can buy a home 12 months after a foreclosure.

With the FHA Back To Work Program, how soon until I can buy a home after a short sale?

Via the program, you can buy a home 12 months after a short sale.

With the FHA Back To Work Program, how soon until I can buy a home after a deed-in-lieu of foreclosure?

Via the program, you can buy a home 12 months after a deed-in-lieu of foreclosure.

With the FHA Back To Work Program, how soon until I can buy a home after Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

Via the program, you can buy a home 12 months after filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

With the FHA Back To Work Program, how soon until I can buy a home after Chapter 13 bankruptcy?

Via the program, you can buy a home 12 months after filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

Is there a counseling requirement in order to use the FHA Back To Work program?

Yes, in order to the use the program, you must agree to attend housing counseling.

Will my housing counselor help me shop for mortgage rates?

No, your housing counselor will not help you shop for mortgage rates. However, many counselors can help you read a Good Faith Estimate which may help you make better lending decisions.

Why do I need to take housing counseling?

The housing counseling required by the FHA Back To Work program will address the cause of your economic event, and help you consider actions which may prevent reoccurance.

How long is the housing counseling session I am required to take?

The housing counseling required will typically last one hour.

Do I have to take housing counseling in-person?

No, you do not have to take the housing counseling in-person. Housing counseling may also be conducted by phone or via the internet.

If I complete counseling, am I automatically approved for the FHA loan?

No, you are not automatically approved for the FHA loan if you complete the housing counseling required. You must still qualify for the FHA mortgage based on Federal Housing Administration mortgage guidelines.

What is the minimum credit score requirement for the FHA Back To Work program?

There is no minimum credit score requirement for the FHA Back To Work program, necessarily. The program follows standard FHA mortgage guidelines. Credit scores below 500 are not allowed, but borrowers with no credit score whatsoever remain eligible. The Federal Housing Administration doesn’t change mortgage rates based on credit score.

Are modified mortgages eligible for FHA Back To Work?

Yes, modified mortgages are eligible.

Are loans on a payment plan eligible for FHA Back To Work?

Yes, loans on a payment plan are eligible.

I lost my job because my employer went out of business? Does this qualify for the program?

Yes, job loss resulting from an employer going out of business is Back-to-Work eligible. Your lender will ask you to provide a written termination notice or publicly-available documentation of the business closure.

Can I use Unemployment Income receipts to document that I was out of work?

Yes, you can use Unemployment Income receipt to document that you were out of work.

I am unemployed. Can I still use the program?

Yes, you can use the FHA Back To Work program if you are unemployed.

I am still in Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Do I need the court’s permission to enter into the mortgage?

Yes, if your Chapter 13 bankruptcy has not been discharged prior to the date of your loan application, you must have written permission from Bankruptcy Court to enter into the purchase transaction.

When does the FHA Back To Work – Extenuating Circumstances program end?

The FHA Back To Work – Extenuating Circumstances program ends September 30, 2016.

CLICK HERE to read the release from HUD

SOURCE: The Mortgage Reports

A reverse-mortgage nightmare

An elderly N.Y. woman received $273,000 from a reverse mortgage that may have cost her as much as $1.5 million, her daughter says.

Call it the estate-devouring, nightmare home loan you hope to never encounter: A reverse mortgage with a base interest rate of 9.95 percent, plus a 50 percent share for the lender of increases in value of the house after closing, plus an additional 2 percent “maturity fee” to sweeten the payout even more.

On top of that, there’s a $33,000 mandatory purchase of an annuity by the homeowner that is added to the principal balance and incurs compounding interest while lessening the lender’s future payments to the homeowner.

Is this for real? Do mortgages with terms like this actually exist in this country today? They do. Talk to Sarah Havemeyer, of Southampton, N.Y., who’s been fighting a California bank in court for two years over her late mother’s reverse mortgage that dates back to 1997.

Although the bank, OneWest, has not yet provided a total of what it believes is owed on the reverse mortgage, according to Havemeyer, she estimates it could be in the neighborhood of $1.5 million to $1.6 million. By comparison, the amount Havemeyer’s mother actually received from the reverse mortgage between 1997 and her death in 2010 was just $272,911.51.

A reverse mortgage places a lien against a senior’s home in exchange for periodic or lump-sum payments. The full amount borrowed does not come due until the borrower dies, moves or sells the home.

Nearly one in 10 federally backed reverse mortgages is in default, risking foreclosure for owners. Family members need to be involved from Day One. And stay involved.

OneWest, for its part, isn’t talking. The bank declined to discuss either Havemeyer’s litigation or any details of the reverse-mortgage terms. The law firm representing OneWest’s subsidiary that claims ownership of the reverse-mortgage note — Financial Freedom Acquisition — did not respond to a request for comment.

Financial Freedom has filed for foreclosure, seeking payment of the $272,911.51, plus “interest at the rate stated” in the mortgage along with legal and other fees. The filing did not indicate that a huge chunk of the “interest” due flows from its 50-50 share in the appreciation of the house from $556,000 in 1997 to its approximate current value around $1.8 million.

Havemeyer, who is executor of her mother’s estate, is challenging the foreclosure, claiming Financial Freedom has not been able to present documentation that it actually owns the mortgage, and the terms of the loan are “unconscionable and usurious” and violate state law.

Were it not for the unusual terms of the mortgage, Havemeyer’s dispute with the bank and its subsidiary might be seen as just another real-estate squabble in the high-gloss Hamptons on New York’s Long Island. But the terms make this case jump out as special.

Start with the triple whammy of 50-50 appreciation sharing, plus the mandatory annuity added to the loan balance, plus the 2 percent extra fee tacked on at the end. Although the vast majority of reverse mortgages have never employed such payment terms, thousands that were marketed in the 1990s did.

In the late 1990s, a series of California lawsuits claimed that terms such as these amounted to “financial abuse of the elderly” and allowed lenders to “[reap] unfair profits at the expense of the elderly,” many of whom ended up owing far more than they borrowed.

A consolidated class-action suit was later settled by the defendants — Transamerica, Transamerica HomeFirst, Metropolitan Life Insurance and Financial Freedom Senior Funding — for $8 million. None of the companies admitted wrongdoing.

Through a long chain of events spanning the mortgage crash, OneWest Bank acquired reverse-mortgage assets that dated back to Transamerica and Financial Freedom Senior Funding, including the loan now in dispute.

A widow and 78 when she obtained her loan from Transamerica Home First, Sarah C. Hoge, Havemeyer’s mother, did not seek guidance from family members. Havemeyer’s lawyer in the foreclosure case, Michael Walsh, says, “I can’t imagine that Mrs. Hoge really did understand what she was getting into.” But she signed up, and ultimately did not opt out of the class-action settlement in California, which provided her a payment of $8,480.

How Havemeyer’s case ultimately turns out is anybody’s guess. But the bottom line is this: Reverse mortgages, even today’s friendlier versions that offer upfront counseling, can be hazardous to elderly borrowers’ financial health and potentially costly for their heirs.

Nearly one in 10 federally backed reverse mortgages is in default, risking foreclosure for owners. Family members need to be involved from Day One. And stay involved.

SOURCE: Seattle Times

VIDEO: Understanding Home Mortgage Basics

 

 

This is a short video created by Wells Fargo that explains the basics elements as it relates to a home mortgage. Worth watching, especially if you have never financed a home before.

Wells Fargo, Citigroup Halt Foreclosure Sales

Wells Fargo (WFC) and Citigroup (NYSE:C) have halted the vast majority of their foreclosure sales in multiple states following the release of new guidance by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.

The abrupt slowdown came in response to the OCC’s April release of minimum standards for foreclosure sales, which are usually the final act in the foreclosure process. The Federal Reserve issued identical guidance to the banks it oversees, making the guidelines universal for the industry.

Within two weeks of the release of the guidance, Wells Fargo, Citi and JPMorgan Chase (JPM) all but stopped foreclosure sales, which are usually the point of no return in the foreclosure process. JPMorgan has since resumed its normal volume.

The OCC guidance is significant because it applies to all OCC-regulated bank servicing

The halt is most dramatic with Wells, the nation’s largest mortgage originator. The bank’s foreclosure sales in five Western states — California, Nevada, Arizona, Oregon and Washington — dropped from as many as 349 a day in April to fewer than 10 a day across the entire region, according to Foreclosure Radar, a California real estate monitoring firm.

“Wells Fargo has temporarily postponed certain foreclosure sales while we study the revised guidance from the OCC,” a spokeswoman for the bank wrote in response to questions from American Banker. The bank expects the delay will be brief.

A spokeswoman for Citi said that the bank is “in the process of complying and following the directive.” JPMorgan acknowledged that it temporarily halted foreclosure sales “out of an abundance of caution,” but says it has resumed them after validating that its processes comply with the OCC guidance.

The OCC acknowledged that some banks had drastically cut back on foreclosure sales. It declined to say if its April guidance was the result of new perceived shortcomings in the industry.

“The OCC did not direct a slowdown or pausing,” agency spokesman Bryan Hubbard says. “However, if servicers are not certain they are meeting these standards, pausing foreclosures is a responsible and productive step.”

The significance of the banks’ move is hard to gauge. New foreclosure filings continue unabated, searches of court records in California and Florida suggest.

It is not clear what — if any — specific concerns caused the banks to rein in sales. But the banks’ steps are an echo of the 2010 foreclosure halt that kicked off several years of wrenching procedural scrutiny of the mortgage servicing industry.

The robo-signing debacle “was the only other time we’ve had a similar event where a bank slowed down significantly,” says Sean O’ Toole, Foreclosure Radar’s founder.

Among the major largest servicers, Bank of America is the only bank which has proceeded as usual following the OCC guidance, according to Foreclosure Radar’s data. That is a reversal from 2010, when it was the first bank to halt foreclosure proceedings following allegations of documentation problems.

The OCC guidance is significant because it applies to all OCC-regulated bank servicing, rather than specific consent orders. Most of the requirements — presented in a list of 13 questions banks should ask themselves before selling a home — are remedial. Question No. 1, for example, is “Is the loan’s default status accurate?” Question No. 5 asks whether borrowers are protected from foreclosure by bankruptcy. Question No. 7 asks if the borrower is in an “active trial loss mitigation plan,” otherwise known as a modification.

“Failure to comply with this guidance may result in unsafe and unsound banking practices, non-compliance with foreclosure related consent orders, as applicable, and/or require rescission of completed foreclosures,” the OCC warned.

Neither Wells nor the OCC identified specific areas of concern for the bank. But Wells has faced scrutiny of its foreclosure handling, most recently from New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman. At a heavily publicized press conference earlier this month, Schneiderman alleged that Wells Fargo had “flagrantly violated” its obligations to homeowners under a 50-state mortgage servicing settlement.

“There have been problems with Wells’ servicing for a long time,” says Ira Rheingold, executive director of the National Association of Consumer Advocates. “Everybody focuses on Bank of America (BAC), but Wells has just as much trouble and the OCC is obviously serious about having them comply with the consent orders.”

Wells has been the target of intense criticism for several years from consumer advocates, who forced CEO John Stumpf off the stage during a speech in March, protested at his home and urged the OCC to give Wells a failing Community Reinvestment Act grade based on its foreclosure practices.

Wells also has invited criticism from consumer advocates for failing to provide principal reductions and to report data on loan modifications, short sales and foreclosures based on race and income.

The bank has disputed those complaints. Wells says it should be judged on the nearly 850,000 loan  modifications it has granted since 2008, which included $6.6 billion in principal forgiveness.

Joseph Smith, the independent monitor of the national mortgage settlement, is expected to issue a report in June. Many consumer advocates have criticized the top five mortgage servicers — B of A, JPMorgan Chase, Citi, Wells Fargo and Ally — for claiming to have met 304 different servicing standards and reforms as part of the $25 billion national settlement with 49 state attorneys general and federal regulators.

“It’s a safe assumption that they’re not meeting all the requirements and this is likely a preview, an early signal of what Joe Smith is going to find,” Rheingold says.

SOURCE: American Banker

HARP Refinancing Program Extended By 2 Years

Underwater homeowners with Fannie Mae- and Freddie Mac-backed mortgages will be able to try to refinance their mortgages for another two years.

The Federal Housing Finance Agency announced Thursday that Fannie and Freddie’s Home Affordable Refinance Program, which was set to expire Dec. 31, will be extended until the end of 2015.

“More than 2 million homeowners have refinanced through HARP, proving it a useful tool for reducing risk,” said FHFA acting director Edward DeMarco, in a statement.

According to the most recent data, in January alone, one in five refinancings of Fannie and Freddie-backed loans occurred under HARP. Of the loans refinanced under the program  that month, 25 percent had a loan-to-value ratio of greater than 125 percent.

Eligibility for the program, announced in early 2009, remain the same. The mortgage must be owned or guaranteed by Fannie or Freddie on or before May 31, 2009, and the current loan-to-value ratio must be greater than 80 percent.

In addition, borrowers must be current on their mortgage payments, with no late payments in the past six months and they cannot have made more than one late payment in the past 12 months.

To apply for the program, borrowers should contact their existing lender or another lender participating in the program. Consumers do not need to use outside companies that bill themselves as “mortgage experts” or “foreclosure specialists,” the agency said.

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Mortgage Complaint Window Now Open!

Got a beef with your mortgage company or loan servicer?

Lots of people do, and thousands of them have been turning to a federal complaint hotline for action — or at least a quick response from the lender.

The Complaint FormConsumer Financial Protection Bureau opened up its bulging online complaint hotline files to public view last week, and the contents are startling: Though the CFPB’s complaint window is open to various financial disputes — credit cards, student loans, credit reporting agencies, bank loans to consumers — by far the biggest source of complaints is home mortgages. Nearly half of all disputes reported to the agency by consumers are mortgage related: problems with payments, escrow accounts, servicing, FHA and conventional loans, home equity lines, second mortgages, reverse mortgages, loan modification delays, application foul-ups and the like.

The new database (accessible at www.consumerfinance.gov and updated daily with fresh cases) doesn’t provide the gory details of specific alleged misdeeds. Nor does it identify the consumers filing complaints other than by ZIP code and the general nature of their dispute. But it does identify the banks or mortgage lenders that are the targets of the complaints and whether they responded to the agency to try to resolve the matter.

In the vast majority of cases, lenders have responded within 15 days — often apparently to the satisfaction of their customers. When the CFPB receives a complaint, it verifies that the consumer is indeed a customer of the bank or mortgage company, but does not attempt to determine whether the allegations by the consumer have merit. It contacts the lender, provides a secure portal for a reply, then informs the consumer about the lender’s response using a separate secure portal.

When the case is posted to the online database, it’s catalogued as either in progress, closed, closed with an explanation, closed with monetary relief to the consumer, closed with non-monetary relief or closed with dispute comments added to the file by the consumer indicating unhappiness with the lender’s response.

Does the hotline system really work?

Bob Ogle of Tucson, whose case number and ZIP code are posted in the database, describes himself as a big fan. He filed a complaint about a mortgage servicing company in Texas Feb. 8 protesting a pending foreclosure action against his mother. Not only was the CFPB’s response swift, the agency contacted the loan servicer immediately and obtained a response. The foreclosure was canceled and the entire dispute resolved.

“I got a letter stopping the foreclosure on Feb. 12,” he said in a telephone interview. “How can you do better than that?”

However, banks and mortgage lenders aren’t as thrilled about the newly released complaint database as Ogle is. For one thing, they are named, even if the complaint ultimately turns out to have been unfounded. Also, the searchable feature of the database allows anyone to check on the number of complaints filed against any specific lender, which some large banks consider unfair given that their high volumes of transactions are almost guaranteed to generate more complaint filings than would smaller lenders.

For example, of the roughly 50,000 mortgage complaints in the database at the end of March, 15,179 — about 30 percent — named Bank of America. Another 8,030 named Wells Fargo, 2,257 were against JPMorgan Chase, and 2,147 named Citibank, all among the highest-volume mortgage originators and servicers active in the market. Nearly 3,400 named Ocwen Financial Corp., a company that specializes in servicing large portfolios of underwater, delinquent and subprime mortgages.

Richard Hunt, president and CEO of the Consumer Bankers Association, says the CFPB’ s approach on this is flawed. “A better service to consumers,” he said, “would have allowed for collaboration between the CFPB and financial institutions to determine if a complaint is indeed valid, prior to publication.”

Bank of America spokesman Dan Frahm maintains that his company’s disproportionate share of complaints in the database stems from its purchase of Countrywide Home Loans, which was one of the largest and most controversial loan originators and servicers during the subprime boom. Despite these legacy problems, Frahm added, 98 percent of the mortgage-related complaints sent to it by the CFPB “have been closed.”

How can you use the CFPB mortgage hotline if you’ve got a dispute with a lender or bank?

You can file online at www.consumerfinance.gov/Complaint

Call toll-free at 1-855-411-CFPB.

Snail mail: CFPB, P.O. Box 4503, Iowa City, Iowa, 52244.

SOURCE: National Real Estate Development Center

 

Sequestration Could Devastate Fed Housing Programs

Automatic government spending cuts could result in 75,000 fewer households receiving foreclosure-prevention aid along with rental and counseling services through the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Shaun Donovan, HUD Secretary, sent that warning to lawmakers Thursday when discussing the impact sequestration could have on homeowners during a Senate Appropriations Committee.

It’s not just foreclosure counseling and prevention programs that would feel the impact of automatic cuts.

GovBudgetCutsAnother 125,000 individuals or families could lose assistance offered through the Housing Choice Voucher program, putting more people at risk of becoming homeless, Donovan told the panel. The HCV program currently provides support to families who are renting in private apartment units.

Donovan added that sequestration cuts could cause more than 100,000 formerly homeless Americans, including veterans, to be removed from their current residences or emergency housing programs.

“Much of this damage will be done through cuts to HUD’s Continuum of Care programs, under which formerly homeless families and individuals are quickly re-housed and given other assistance to move them towards self-sufficiency,” he explained.

“In addition, the sequestration cuts would eliminate some of the key funding for the nation’s shelter system for the homeless provided by the Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG) program.”

HUD programs related to home safety and rehabilitation also would take a hit, Donovan said. About 2,100 housing units for low-income families would no longer have funding available through the Home Investment Partnerships program.

“These cuts will have an even broader effect on local economies, particularly because historically, every dollar of HOME funding is leveraged with almost four dollars of other governmental or private investment for the production or rehabilitation of affordable single or multi- family housing,” Donovan said. “This will mean fewer jobs in and more harm to local construction and related industries.”

Mortgage In Trouble? You’re Not Alone.


When you struggle with your mortgage payments, you become frozen. Petrified. Not knowing what to do, you do nothing. Know that you’re not alone, but people who take action are far more likely to get the most positive outcome. So do something.

A free government program called Making Home Affordable may be your solution to getting back on track.

The team at Hallmark Idaho Properties understands the process and is here to help. As Certified Short Sale Experts® we know how to get the results you need.

Real Help. Real Answers. Right Now.